Tag Archives: best place to buy cheap nfl jerseys

Cheap Carolina Panthers Jersey Wholesale From China For Free Shipping

Panthers coach Ron Rivera

Panthers coach Ron Rivera

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera said he was surprised and disappointed to learn on Sunday that owner Jerry Richardson, amid allegations of workplace misconduct, planned to put the team up for sale after the 2017 season.

But Rivera made it clear that the Panthers, 10-4 and tied with New Orleans atop the NFC South, will continue to “go forward” with their playoff push and let the investigation by the NFL into Richardson’s conduct play out.

Sports Illustrated published an article on Sunday that said the organization settled financially with a least four employees regarding Richardson’s improper behavior in the workplace.

The allegations ranged from sexual harassment to Richardson using a racial slur with a former team scout.

“They’re all very serious,” Rivera said Monday of the allegations. “I do have a lot of concern about it. To be honest with you, I have not read them. I’m not dismissing them, because I’m going to wait until the investigation is done before I draw any conclusions. I think that’s the only fair thing to do. I don’t want to have anything altering my thought process.

“The investigation will take a life of its own. I believe it will be a thorough one. And remember, Mr. Richardson was the one that pushed for this to begin with.”

NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said Monday that “the league is moving forward with the investigation.”

Rivera’s focus will be on preparing for Sunday’s home game against Tampa Bay. The Panthers can clinch a playoff spot with a victory.

Rivera spoke on Monday to his players about Richardson’s decision to sell since the news broke after they departed Bank of America Stadium following Sunday’s 31-24 victory over Green Bay. He reminded them that their focus should be on football just as it has when the team has faced other off-the-field distractions in the past.

“I don’t know how much different it is from some of the things we’ve dealt with,” he said. “The thing that again we all have to understand is the serious nature of these allegations and who they affect.

“For the most part, these people need to be heard, respect what they have to say and again let the process take its course.”

Rivera said he spoke with Richardson on Sunday night just before the owner announced his decision to sell in a letter posted on the team website.

“He was terrific in terms of our conversation,” Rivera said, declining to elaborate on specifics of the conversation.

Rivera said he hoped new ownership keeps the team in Charlotte. Richardson in 2013 made a deal when the city agreed to pay for upgrades to the stadium that the team would be tethered to Charlotte through the 2018 season.

“This organization has had a tremendous impact on the Carolinas,” Rivera said. “It has helped the growth of this city and this community. It’s been a source of pride and goodwill. I’d like to see it continue.

“This is a great community, a very supportive fan base that’s been out there for us. I hope that somehow it’s able to stay here.”

As for the allegations, Rivera said he wouldn’t make a judgment until the investigation is over.

“Not to discount the serious nature of these allegations, for us, for what we do, we’re here to play football,” he said. “It’s important that we remember that. These allegations don’t change what we do. So we’ve got to go out and focus on getting ready for Tampa Bay.”

Panthers tight end Ed Dickson didn’t want to go into details about the allegations against Richardson.

“Personally, it’s sad to me, the whole thing,” he said. “We work to be better people, better individuals, better whatever you want to call it and to see that happen, it just saddened me as an individual. I got a lot of respect for our owner. He gave me an opportunity to come here and further my career and do the things I need to do as a football player, and I can only touch basis on a personal level from my standpoint of view.”

Defensive coordinator Steve Wilks, who grew up in Charlotte, also hopes the team doesn’t move elsewhere.

One of the top African-American head-coaching candidates in the NFL, Wilks said he had never heard Richardson use a racial slur.

“In my six years around here I never encountered anything around here of that sorts,” he said. “Never have I heard of that. I’m just going to wait and see exactly what comes through the investigation.”

Cheap Tampa Bay Buccaneers Jersey Wholesale From China

GREEN BAY, Wis. — If Sunday’s game against the Green Bay Packers shows anything, it’s that for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, it may always be a mixed bag with quarterback Jameis Winston. He’ll give you some big-time plays, but also will make some amazingly poor decisions, such as the one Sunday that led to a lost fumble and a 26-20 overtime loss.

He spent three weeks on the sideline watching veteran Ryan Fitzpatrick lead the team to two wins by taking few risks. Yet Winston’s fumble in the second quarter Sunday showed that he has failed to absorb one of the most important lessons a quarterback can learn, something he continues to fail at in his third year in the NFL: knowing when a play is dead.

Under duress, Winston coughed up the ball as he was being taken down, resulting in a fumble recovery returned 62 yards by Dean Lowry for a touchdown. It was first-and-10. Winston should have taken the sack and lived to see another play. Instead, the Packers extended their lead to 17-7.

“I don’t even know how the ball came out,” Winston said. “I think when I ran back, I think I hit a guy’s butt or something. I don’t even know. I just know I was going out to the right, trying to actually throw it away, but I think when I ran back, I hit someone. … I had Cameron Brate on a route in front of me so I was about to throw it in front of him.”

Earlier in the game, on the opening drive, Winston hit Brate down the seam for a 28-yard touchdown, the first time the Bucs had scored a touchdown on an opening drive all year. For a unit that has struggled with slow starts, that was huge progress. He’d hit Brate again for a game-tying touchdown in the fourth quarter, another plus.

“It really did [feel like it was going to be a good day]. It really was,” Brate said. “We just kind of killed ourselves, whether it was sacks — those kind of killed our momentum, a couple calls didn’t go our way, the turnover — those killed us. … Ultimately we shot ourselves in the foot.”

Winston’s fumble, plus two Tampa Bay fumbles at the goal line, were unacceptable. You can’t pin that all on Winston when he was in the middle of changing a protection and the ball is snapped, but this team has to have more composure in high-pressure situations, Winston included.

To be fair, Winston didn’t find out until Sunday that he would be taking snaps from Evan Smith, a backup guard. Backup center Joe Hawley was to step in for starting center Ali Marpet, who landed on injured reserve this week, but Hawley came down with an illness.

“I don’t think I had my hands under Evan in about a year,” Winston admitted. “We had like two miscommunications and we just found out today that this was gonna be our offensive line. We did not think we’d be in this situation today. This was a game-time decision.”

The Bucs’ offensive line had an atrocious performance without Marpet and without starting right tackle Demar Dotson. They surrendered seven sacks — nearly a team record for the Packers — and on multiple instances, defenders were coming at Winston completely unabated.

“We didn’t protect Jameis nearly as well as we protected this year. That [was] probably our worst protection game that we played all year,” said head coach Dirk Koetter, who praised Winston for competing hard throughout the game despite it.

“We’ve talked about this many times. Jameis, he is gonna make some plays — he made a couple really nice scramble plays today, and he was under pressure all day — that particular one there, in a perfect world, he would have gotten that ball out of his hands but they were on him quick. But we’ve got to remember — he’s 23 years old and experience is still the best teacher.”

Something Winston did do well, and perhaps it’s something he absorbed from watching Fitzpatrick, was taking what the defense gave him. That meant checking down when facing pressure instead of pushing the envelope, trying to get an explosive play. That also meant utilizing Peyton Barber, who stepped in for Doug Martin and rushed for 102 yards — the first time a Bucs running back has eclipsed 100 yards in a game this season.

At 4-8 now, with the Bucs’ hopes of reaching the playoffs slim-to-none, these next four games are a chance for Winston to restore waning confidence in the offense and his ability to lead it — although he has a ways to go before he can achieve that in a season marred by injury and failed expectations.

Cheap New York Giants Jersey From China For Sale

New York Giants

New York Giants

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — New York Giants coach Ben McAdoo held a “long, hard, honest meeting” on Wednesday with his players on their first day back to work this week. During the meeting, he put some plays on the screen from Sunday’s 31-21 loss at the San Francisco 49ers that McAdoo described as an inconsistent desire to finish.

It was a vastly different meeting than the Giants are used to when they arrive to work on Wednesday mornings. This one was more to the point and critical.

“Message to them in the meeting was we had some open conversations, some hard talks, some plain talks, some simple talk, played some film and were brutally honest with each other,” McAdoo said. “We’ll see how the players respond. They had a nice day of practice [Wednesday]. We also talked about the great opportunity in front of us.”

The Giants (1-8) have seven games remaining, beginning with a difficult matchup on Sunday with the Kansas City Chiefs. The Giants are 10.5-point underdogs at home.

They’re hoping the meeting correlates to a better product. They’ve conceded that what was put on the field over the past few weeks was embarrassing.

Still, it took until Week 11 for this kind of meeting to happen. It might have been too late, with this season long dead.

The Giants are in last place in the NFC East and have allowed 82 points in the past two games combined.

“Yeah, definitely,” cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie said about the meeting possibly occurring too late.

“I think it would’ve put guys at a different attention on alert back then, because nobody wants to be called out,” he later added. “I don’t care what you say. Nobody wants to have that play up there where you have to come back in the locker room and everybody is looking at you like you’re that guy.

“I think it could’ve helped if it were done earlier or not, but at least it got done.”

The meeting occurred after the Giants were blown out by the previously winless 49ers. Cornerback Janoris Jenkins appeared to be one of the biggest offenders with his effort on several tackles.

But Jenkins was not alone. McAdoo explained in his Monday conference call that he didn’t see a consistent desire to finish throughout the game. He provided that same explanation when asked specifically about Jenkins, who was unavailable for comment on Wednesday as the Giants began preparations for the Chiefs.

McAdoo said there is a “possibility there were to be some changes” this week as a result. He did not provide any specifics.

It was clear that the players’ efforts were a point of contention at Wednesday’s meeting.

“At some points [efforts were questioned],” linebacker Devon Kennard said. “Just guys could have given more effort.”

The players saw it on tape. They didn’t reject the notion that it was insufficient.

“The only thing I can say is disappointing is the lack of want-to after all we’ve been through,” Rodgers-Cromartie said. “I’ll take a lost play flying around. But how we’re losing …”

The Giants have lost each of their past three games by double digits. They’ve allowed 14 plays of over 20 yards in the past two weeks.

The meeting was McAdoo’s last-ditch effort to get his team back on the same page after a pair of recent suspensions and blowout losses have its season seemingly off the rails.

“It was just an opportunity for everybody to see what was going on, from both sides of the ball,” Kennard said. “We got to see some of the offensive plays and hear Coach McAdoo coach some guys up on the offensive side and the defensive side, and I think it’s just a good way for everybody to be held accountable for what’s going on, on and off the field.”

Cheap Green Bay Packers Jersey From China Free Shipping

GREEN BAY (WLUK) — Green Bay might be the home of the Pack, but what many don’t realize is Titletown has actually came close to losing the team–on several occasions.

The thought can be shocking, after all the Packers have always called Green Bay home.

NFL teams, like the Pack, form strong bonds with their fans.

Would the Packers ever leave Titletown?

Listen to what Packers President Mark Murphy told fans at this summer’s Packers shareholders’ meeting:

“With our ownership structure for us the other top priority is making sure we stay in Green Bay,” said Murphy. He continued, “And I think investing in the community in the way we are with Titletown really helps insure that this team will stay here.”

FOX11 Investigates asked Murphy about his choice of words.

“You bring up the words, ‘…to insure the team stays here in Green Bay.’ Which brings up the question, ‘Is there a chance the team could leave Green Bay?’”

“Well hopefully not,” said Murphy, “but if you look at the history and go back many years it’s almost a miracle the Packers have stayed in Green Bay.”

NFL teams leaving one home for another is just part of the game. The driving force? Money.

The Packers hold the distinction for being the oldest NFL franchise without changing its name or home. But Packers historian Cliff Christl points out history shows even the mighty have fallen.

“I mean Los Angeles, Cleveland, Baltimore, Houston. They had all lost teams, they’re ranked among the top 10 in the country in population,” said Christl. “If it can happen there, obviously it could happen in little Green Bay.”

Christl agreed it’s all about the money for teams.

“Ya, as an NFL partner you’ve got to hold up your end of the business,” said Christl.

Packers fans FOX11 Investigates caught up with enjoying the new Titletown District Park have a view that’s more loyal, when asked if they had any concern the Packers would leave Green Bay.

“You know I never really had a concern about them. I grew up here all my life not far from the stadium here. I was never concerned the Packers would leave,” said Jim Swanson, a lifelong Packers fan.

“No, no. We have the best fans. Why would they want to go anywhere?” questioned Packers fan Amy LaPointe.

Since the Packers aren’t controlled by a single owner, some believe a shareholder vote would be needed for any potential move out of Green Bay. Murphy says that’s not the case.

“I don’t think the organization would ever vote to leave Green Bay, but if it was dire enough you could see the league saying, ‘you know Green Bay you’re too small, you can’t compete anymore.’”

In fact, FOX 11 Investigates discovered the Packers franchise came close to disappearing from Green Bay on several occasions. Christl says it began in the early years of the team’s incorporation in 1923.

“At that time when that incorporation was created there were no assurances the Packers were going to be around for the full season, much less the next year 5 years down the road,” said Christl.

Fast forward to 1956, the city was old to fund a new stadium. The high school field at City Stadium was no longer acceptable to the NFL.

“That was basically going to determine if they were going to keep the franchise. I mean the league pretty much let them know either build a stadium or you’re at risk to lose your team,” added Christl.

Christl says the threat to remove football from Green Bay was real.

“I say it often, the Packers were perpetually on their deathbed,” said Christl.

New City Stadium saved the Packers that time. It would transform over the years to become Lambeau Field. But even after Super Bowl success in the mid-90s, Green Bay almost lost the Pack again in 2000.

“No matter how we try to adjust our pricing and to make this more adequate we are going to continue to slide,” said then team President Bob Harlan. Harlan led the push to re-develop Lambeau Field.

David Steffen was hired to head up ‘Team Lambeau’ to get out a ‘yes’ vote in a referendum for a half percent county sales tax to fund $295-million of the cost of redevelopment.

“It was critical, critical in my estimation to the long-term success and potential survival of the organization,” said Steffen, now a state assemblyman from Howard, looking back.

Despite success on the field and selling out every game, Steffen says the Packers needed the redevelopment to be able to generate more money.

“I specifically remember a call from a southeast Wisconsin County executive, I won’t mention, but he said, ‘when your referendum fails, call me and we’ll build a stadium for you down here,’” said Steffen.

Steffen says the Packers executive team made a point not to threaten Brown County residents with an ultimatum that if the referendum didn’t pass Green Bay could lose the Packers.

Harlan, just a month before the vote, indicated to FOX11 the Packers had run out of options.

“I keep getting calls from people if this fails you must have a Plan B. We’ve reached that, this is not nearly the plan that was unveiled on January 22,” said Harlan in August of 2000.

Harlan was then asked, “What’s Plan C?” His answer—“Plan C is death.”

We asked Steffen if the referendum failed, would the Packers still be playing at Lambeau Field?

“In my estimation the Green Bay Packers would likely not be in Green Bay,” said Steffen.

As it turns out the redevelopment of Lambeau Field paid off. It not only kept the Packers in Green Bay, it helped to raise enough money for a south end zone expansion in 2012 and renovations to the Atrium in 2013, worth $285-million. Those projects were completely funded by the Green Bay Packers.

The team’s latest venture is in the Packers’ owned Titletown District, a mix of business, entertainment and public attractions. Earlier this month the Packers and Microsoft unveiled a business incubator venture called Titletown Tech.

“Certainly we hope to make money and hope it is profitable but it was also I think one of our main motivations was to invest in the community,” said Murphy.

The Packers franchise is now one of the biggest money makers in the league. Forbes ranks its worth at $2.55 billion, with annual revenue of more than $420-million.

“I think now with what’s been done with the stadium and the Titletown District, you know, the foreseeable future, the Packer are going to be in Green Bay,” said Christl.

“For us making sure the team stays here is a priority,” said Murphy.